Tag Archive | photos

June Happenings

Our club is enjoying a busy spring – and we have the photos to prove it! Let’s begin with the May General meeting, which featured Carol C’s comprehensive (and delicious) herb presentation. Along with three assistants, Carol used posters, books, plants, soup, dip, bread, and jelly to educate her audience. She shared recipes for Herb Butter, Potato Soup, Wendy’s May Jelly, Smoked Salmon and Chervil Pate; A Refined Little Salad (made with Bibb lettuce), and Cheese Dilly Bread. Carol also recommended a number of cookbooks.

The Design Committee displayed the charming results of their Tussie Mussie Workshop:

And here are the tussie mussies in the making:

Other business at the May meeting included the election of Officers and the approval of the budget for our 2022-2023 season. Announcements were made about the success of the yard sale, the Veterans Garden clean up, Veterans Garden water and maintenance schedule, and American Independence Museum gardens progress. Planning for our table at the Yuletide Fair in November was also undertaken, with sign-up sheets available for those projects as well as for a Mad Hatters party being hosted by Jill C and Jan C. All in all, a very busy meeting!

Lest you think that May was all fun and good food, we also have been putting substantial effort into our commnnity service projects. A team of members took on the Veterans Garden at Stratham Hill Park, doing a spring clean-up and preparing it for the summer season. As always, it remains a peaceful and beautiful spot for contemplation.

Plantings are continuing to be installed at the American Independence Museum in Exeter. More perennials were added and Karen W. and her husband are still working to perfect the drip watering system. More shrubs and perennials are still to be added, but the improvement in the gardens so far is dramatic.

Another EAGC community service is the awarding of a scholarship to a deserving Seacoast School of Technology student who will be pursuing a degree in a field related to horticulture. This spring we awarded a $1000 scholarship to Zachary Hodgman. He is an honors graduating senior from SST/Epping HS. Zachary will be attending Great Bay Community College this fall majoring in Environmental Science as a stepping stone to further his education. SST filmed the awards ceremony. You can see the presentation of our scholarship at the 1:04 point in the filming. Ann DeMarco of SST read our presentation comments: Seacoast School of Technology Scholarship Night – YouTube

Diversions:

The West Newbury (MA) Garden Club is sponsoring an Art in the Garden Tour, featuring gardens, artists, and musicians. Nine beautiful and inspired gardens located in West Newbury and Groveland will be on display with an art connection. Saturday, June 18th, 10 am – 4 pm. https://www.wngc.org/

Art in Bloom at the Ogunquit Art Museum. You don’t want to miss the artistic collaboration of our own Lee C. and Ann H. June 24-26 at the museum in Ogunquit. https://ogunquitmuseum.org/about-us/events/events-list/

Our favorite wandering photographer, Lynda B., has provided some photos of the gardens in her own back yard on Chestnut Street. Beautiful – and right in the heart of Exeter!

Thanks to our contributing photographers: Lynda B., Ann H., Linda S., and Patti S. These would be very lifeless Happenings without your photos!

March Happenings

It’s safe to say that spring is in the air. Even though that air might feel damp and cold today and snow clouds are hovering overhead, most of us are sensing a certain optimism that we’ll soon be poking around in our gardens again. All we have to do is look for the early bulbs popping out of the soil in our sunny beds for evidence.

James Brewer, our February speaker, showed us what can be achieved in our landscapes this summer – if we are amazingly talented or if we have him design our gardens. Attendees enjoyed slides of his spectacular landscape design work, along with his descriptions of the projects and of his transition from novice English gardener to established New England landscape designer.

In addition to an interesting selection of very healthy houseplants and tempting homemade snacks, Linda S. provided servings of Green Goddess soup for members. She has shared the recipe for this delicious (and very green) soup – it can be found in the Recipe Box on the website. (Thanks to Patti S. & Ann H. for the photos.)

As a followup to his appearance at our meeting, James Brewer sent us this note:
‘Dear ladies / members of the Stratham & Exeter Garden Club’.

I wanted to send you all a huge thank you for making Bill and I feel so welcome and staying awake while I talked to you all today.
Thank you for the opportunity to share a snippet of my story and discuss some of my gardens both large and small.
I wish you well for the coming season and hope you all enjoy your gardens, have good health and bountiful blooms in 2022…

Cheers,
James & Mr. Billster…

Club News:
Our Budget Committee met on March 3rd to draw up a budget for next year. The membership will be voting on the budget at the May meeting. In the meantime, there are a few vacancies on the board for committee chairs for next year. If you are interested in getting to know more members or becoming more involved, please contact Linda S. to discuss the positions that are available. Current and former board members will tell you that being on the board is the “funnest” part of being a garden club member. And if you’re interested in helping out on the Nominating Committee, there is still time to sign up, by contacting Linda S.

Our club is very excited to announce that, in conjunction with the Exeter Library, we’ll be hosting horticulturalist and garden historian John Forti, on May 24th at 6PM in the library’s Meeting Room. He will be giving a talk on heirloom gardening. John has directed gardens for Plimoth Plantation Museum, Strawberry Banke Museum, Massachusetts Horticultural Society, and Bedrock Gardens. He also serves as a regional Slow Food Governor and biodiversity specialist for Slow Food USA. Here is a synopsis of his presentation:

The Heirloom Gardener – Traditional Plants and Skills is John Forti’s newest presentation.  It draws from his new book of traditional plants and skills for the modern world.  Richly illustrated with period images and contemporary woodcuts, his PowerPoint shares inspiration from our long history of heirloom preservation, garden craft and homestead lifeways.  Artisanal gardening lifestyles that are helping us to rebuild vibrant local agricultural economies and celebrate sustainable cottage industries that are contributing to our new, homegrown American arts & crafts movement and backyard environmentalism.  At a time when we could all use a little good news, we hope you will join us for a refreshing look at how you can make a difference and build habitat in your own backyard and community. 

He also has a book. These days, we all need some good news and a way to participate in meaningful change. The Heirloom Gardener-Traditional Plants and Skills for the Modern World is a book for gardeners who want to deepen their knowledge and improve life for families, pollinators and wildlife in their own backyards.  It’s a love poem to the earth; a map to the art of living intentionally and a guidepost for environmental gardeners and artisans.  It unearths old-ways, storied plants and artisanal life-skills; like seed-saving, herbalism, foraging, distillation, ethnobotany and organics which contribute to a new 21st century arts and crafts movement. With woodcuts from Caldecott Medal VT artist Mary Azarian, The Heirloom Garden offers a dose of wild hope for a weary nation. It is available through this link.

“A Garden for Pollinators & Wildlife: Natural Landscaping for a Better Yard” is a program being offered at the Brentwood Library on Tuesday, March 15 from 7 to 8 pm. The talk will be presented by Vicki J. Brown, NH Natural Resources Steward, Pollinator Pathways NH Organizing Founder and Speaking for Wildlife volunteer. She will provide insights on ways to attract butterflies, bees, birds and other wildlife to your yard. You can sign up by clicking here.

Did you realize that saffron, that pricey and difficult-to-access spice is now being grown in New England? Here’s an interesting article, provided by Linda S., that explains the how and the where of local saffron: Why the Most Expensive Spice in the World Is Now Growing in Hundreds of Small American Farms.

More September Happenings

Donna R. obviously has green thumbs. And she’s a talented photographer too!

 

Organic Beefsteaks — “We had a nice year of tomatoes. “

Organic Carrots

Garlic — “We planted in the fall and harvested them in July. Twenty five huge organic bulbs that made us very excited.”

“Our first attempt at onions brought us a small happy harvest.”

 

Organic Squash — “We thought we would attempt these this year. We have had quite a harvest.”

“When I came to the first meeting you had the speaker from Fuller Gardens. After his talk I decided to try and grow a rose bush. Here is one of the first 7 roses that it keeps producing. I’m very excited about being able to nurture this rose.”

 

“Some of the sunflowers growing in our gardens.”

“I enjoy putting together the window boxes.”

“The mom built a nest on the hose so we had to water from another source until the birds left the nest. We had two other nests in our shrubs and you couldn’t go near them or the mother would aim and dive for your head!!”

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And from Linda V, “My helianthus and Joe Pye weed are still going strong.”

 

 

 

July – August Happenings

Today’s high temperature calls for that time-honored question: “Is it hot enough for you?” Or maybe I could ask, “Is it hot here, or is it just me?” 

Dianna braved the heat to take a few pictures of her gorgeous garden and has shared them with us.

Dianna comments,  “The ‘rock wall’ flower bed contains many flowers from our EAGC auctions, which makes it one of my favorite beds. The big blue pot is from Betsy, aka Swap Shop, bleeding hearts from Susan, beautiful red Japanese maple from Nancy P, evening primrose from Nance, spotted leaf plant from Carole, Canadian ginger from Connie, etc.”

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LuAnn also has a few shots from her garden:

LuAnn says, “This is my favorite shade of pink. They really brighten up a garden. These phlox are a hybrid – so very little mildew.”

“Every year, this hydrangea produces at least 3 colors of blooms. This year is a bonus year for blooms, but they’re mostly on the lower part of the plant and none is on its north or west side.” 

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Here’s a new Promise Tree leaf that sounds really tempting! This is from Edie:

Tired of weeding your garden? For a $20 donation to the Promise Tree, I will weed your garden for 2 hours. To call me to schedule a time, click here: Edie

Lee’s offer of  Iris bulbs is still available too. She’ll have them available at the Meeting/Lunch on the 16th at Susan’s home.

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Speaking of the August Meeting/Lunch – it’s at noon on Thursday, August 16th, at Susan’s beautiful home. If you haven’t already, please call her to let her know you’re coming and what dish you’ll be bringing.  As an added bonus — we’ll have a chance to get acquainted with some of our newest members!

 

June Happenings

An informal Summer Meeting had been scheduled for next Thursday, July 19. Unfortunately, this meeting had to be cancelled, but Susan C. will be hosting a lunch/barbecue meeting at her home on Thursday, August 16. Watch your email for further details!

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The June Board Meeting includes both the current Board and the new, incoming members of next year’s Board. This is the meeting where next year’s plans are discussed and new Board members are familiarized with their upcoming jobs. Of course none of this happens without good food, so the new Board members were treated to a potluck brunch. Here are a few shots of the action. (Sorry, no food photos!)

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The big news for June was our festive June Luncheon and Plant Auction, held at the Portsmouth Country Club, with 44 attending.  As always, members and guests were able to bid on lots of happy, healthy plants which had been nurtured and donated by fellow members. Max performed admirably as auctioneer again this year – whipping through dozens of plants with efficiency and a hefty dollop of humor. We added $849 to our treasury thanks to the plant sales.

Plants (and Auctioneer Max) arriving for the auction. 

Betsy A. and her Hospitality Committee arranged for a delicious buffet luncheon and lovely table settings, including handmade centerpieces which were raffled off to some happy winners. The Environment & Conservation Committee provided two spectacular baskets packed full of gardening items, one of which was awarded to the member who brought her own coffee cup to the meetings most regularly – a great way to emphasize the “conservation” part of this committee’s goal.  In total, the various raffles brought in almost $125 for our club.

E&C’s Raffle Baskets:

    

Table centerpieces

The luncheon culminated with the installation of  our club’s new Executive Board and the grateful acknowledgement of  outgoing Presidents, Jill and Betsy and Vice-President Mel, for jobs very well done.  Anne C. performed the installation of new officers, presenting each of the five board members with a plant to symbolize their individual responsibility to the club.

Anne C. installing officers

A list of  the full Board, including Committee Chairs, can be found on the website under “Members Only“. (While you’re there, check out some of the other interesting members only info available to you.)

Our new Executive Board: Susan, president; Linda S, vice-president; Vicki, recording secretary; Florence, returning as corresponding secretary; and Jill, treasurer. (All the distractions of this fun event made a better picture impossible!)

More Luncheon Photos (thanks to Nance J.):

 

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Gardening Event

Members of our club have been invited to this interesting and timely presentation:

Please join the Piscataqua Garden Club on Thursday, July 19, 2018 at 10:30 am at The Reading Room, 491 York Street, York Harbor, Maine, for a presentation on the impacts of climate change, “Preparing for Sea Level Rise” , by Gayle Bowness, Science Education Program Manager, Gulf of Maine Research Institute.

We have all noticed the increasing news coverage of intense storms, unusual temperatures, ocean warming and coastal flooding. As these issues become more prevalent in our daily lives, it is becoming more important to understand the impacts of these events – today and in the future. Ensuring the region’s resiliency to climate impacts, such as sea level rise, requires a scientifically informed and engaged public.

Join us for an interactive presentation to explore the data behind sea level rise. Together, we’ll review models projecting impacts in your community and case studies of resiliency from across the globe.

Gayle Bowness, a Nova Scotia native, with a B.S. in Marine Biology from Dalhousie University and a M.S. from Lesley University in Ecological Teaching and Learning will lead us in this experience. Gayle and her family have lived in Cape Elizabeth, Maine for 14 years where they enjoy exploring the state’s coastline. She has been working at Gulf of Maine Research Institute since 2005. As a pioneer in collaborative solutions to global ocean challenges, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, located in Portland, is dedicated to the resilience of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem and the communities that depend on it. Gayle has designed and delivered a variety of education programs, from watersheds to electrical efficiency and is now focused on sea level as the impacts of climate change become increasingly visible.

Understanding more about this timely topic seems to have become a priority of younger generations which we hope captures their and all interested guests’ attention to participate and engage in this event.

Open to the public. Suggested donation $5 at the door.

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 Lee C. has added a Leaf to our Promise Tree:

⇒ Iris — Baby blue to white, sometimes fall-blooming. They grow to 2 1/2 to 3 feet tall. Three dollars a pot while they last. Email Lee to arrange pickup.

Are you new to the club or need a refresher on how our Promise Tree program works? Click here for details!

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