The Tomato Alphabet

23 days ’till spring and soon it will be planting time!!  Watch the countdown here:
Are you trying to choose the best tomatoes to grow when spring finally arrives? Open pollinated/heirloom varieties offer the best assortment of choices but if you have issues with certain tomato diseases, you may want to try a hybrid. Below is a chart that shows what the letters in seed catalogs and on seed packet mean when indicating tomato disease resistance.
Hybrid DOES NOT mean it is GMO. A hybrid vegetable is created when plant breeders intentionally cross-pollinate two different varieties of a plant, aiming to produce an offspring, or hybrid, that contains the best traits of each of the parents. Cross-pollination is a natural process that occurs within members of the same plant species.
GMO plants, on the other hand, are the result of genetic engineering. (“GMO” stands for “genetically modified organism.”) This is a process during which the plant’s DNA is altered in a way that cannot occur naturally, and sometimes includes the insertion of genes from other species.
tomato disease codes
~ Patti

 

Garden Recycling – Save the Eggshells

Tip for today for our gardening friends:  Save your eggshells for a nutritional boost in your garden.  Let them dry out in a container and then pulverize them in your blender to use as a calcium source for your tomatoes, peppers and eggplant.  Lack of calcium can cause blossom end rot, the dark rotted bottoms that can occur if your soil is lacking this critical mineral.  When planting, place a sprinkling of the pulverized shell in the hole. Or, simple mix in with the soil surface after planting.

eggshells

If your garden is prone to slugs and snails, roughly crush the eggshells and encircle them around your plants as a deadly barrier.  The soft bodies of these pests are sliced as they pass over the jagged edges.

Best of all, this recycles what might otherwise end up in the trash and is a natural alternative to using chemical products!